How to Smoke Meat on the Stove Top

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Middle son, Zac, built a cool smoker out of a 55-gal. drum and used auto engine red paint to pretty it up. Everything he’s smoked so far has tasted beyond fantastic! The smell alone will knock you off your feet! 😋 He’s not always on hand to smoke whatever I want, whenever I want, therefore I figured out how to smoke meat the stove top!How to Smoke Meat on a Stove Top | Culinary Craftiness

How to Smoke Meat on the Stove TopZac at the barrel smoker | Culinary CraftinessHow to Smoke Meat on a Stove Top | Culinary Craftiness

It’s all about the taste!

But look at this beauty smoked indoors! 🤣😂 Okay, so it’s pretty much butt ugly, but that doesn’t matter. It’s all about the taste. LOL You won’t believe how delicious smoked chicken is in chicken salad. Leave out the avocado in this recipe and sub in the smoked chicken. So good! How to Smoke Meat on a Stove Top | Culinary CraftinessIt’s much easier to get gorgeous looking pieces by placing them on a baking sheet under the oven broiler for a few minutes after they’re done smoking. 😁

If you don’t already own a large lidded stock pot or waterbath canner, flea markets and yard sales are a good place to look for one on the cheap. Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace might have good used ones, too.

You’ll need:

Whatever you intend to smoke (has to fit in the stock pot).
Your favorite seasonings (NOT barbeque sauce). Butt Rub is a good choice, along with salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, and paprika.
Heavy duty aluminum foil (lots of it).
Small wood chips or sawdust used for smoking food.
A round fryer basket turned upside down for a whole trussed chicken, or large wadded balls of foil, and a round mesh grilling screen (found at Dollar General, Walmart, etc.) for chicken pieces, or a metal colander turned upside down.

How to Smoke Meat on the Stove Top

Firstly, place the pot on a front burner then put a single layer of foil in the bottom (cup the edges a little).Wood chips in the bottom | Culinary Craftiness

Next, place a small pile of wood chips/shavings (about 1 cup) in the center of the foil.

Cover with another piece of foil.

Place your fryer basket upside down in the center or place the foil wads in locations to support the mesh grilling screen.Platform for smoking whole chicken | Culinary Craftiness

After that, lightly spray with oil.

Carefully place seasoned chicken on the upside down colander or fryer basket or pieces on the mesh.How to Smoke Meat on a Stove Top | Culinary CraftinessButter makes everything better! | Culinary Craftiness

Put the lid on and seal firmly in place with copious amounts of foil to prevent the smoke from escaping (however, some little tendrils might). Turn the exhaust fan on.Seal the pot with foil | Culinary Craftiness

Start with the burner on high for a minute or so, until you hear the wood start sizzling and smell it smoking.

After that, turn the heat down to Low/Simmer and begin timing for approximately 1.5 hours.

It’s done!

Turn the burner off and carefully carry the pot outside before removing the lid.

Your house will smell heavenly for a few days, but there shouldn’t be any signs of smoke. Alternatively, you could use your outdoor grill.

If your chicken isn’t completely cooked, place on a baking sheet and continue roasting in the oven until the internal temp in the thigh is 165° and the juices run clear.How to Smoke Meat on a Stove Top | Culinary CraftinessHow to Smoke Meat on a Stove Top | Culinary Craftiness

Eat as is or pull off the bone for future use.How to Smoke Meat on a Stove Top | Culinary Craftiness

How To Smoke Meat on the Stove Top

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 45 minutes

How To Smoke Meat on the Stove Top

Recipe by Melissa Woolard | Culinary Craftiness

Ingredients

  • Whatever you intend to smoke
  • Your favorite seasonings (NOT barbeque sauce). Butt Rub is a good choice, along with salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, and paprika.
  • Heavy duty aluminum foil (lots of it)
  • Small wood chips or sawdust used for smoking food
  • A round fryer basket turned upside down for a whole trussed chicken, or large wadded balls of foil, and a round mesh grilling screen (found at Dollar General, Walmart, etc.) for chicken pieces.

Instructions

  1. Place the pot on a front burner.
  2. Put a single layer of foil in the bottom (cup the edges a little).
  3. Place a small pile of wood chips/shavings (about a 1 cup) in the center of the foil.
  4. Cover with another piece of foil.
  5. Place your fryer basket upside down in the center or place the foil wads in locations to support the mesh grilling screen.
  6. Lightly spray with oil.
  7. Place seasoned chicken or pieces on the mesh.
  8. Put the lid on and lock firmly in place with copious amounts of foil to prevent the smoke from escaping (however, some little tendrils might). Turn on the exhaust fan.
  9. Turn the burner on high for a minute or so, until you hear the wood start sizzling and smell it smoking.
  10. Turn the heat down to Low/Simmer and begin timing for approximately 1.5 hours.
  11. Turn the burner off and carefully carry the pot outside before removing the lid.
  12. Your house will smell heavenly for a few days, but there shouldn't be any signs of smoke.
  13. If your chicken isn't completely cooked, place on a baking sheet and continue roasting in the oven until the internal temp in the thigh is 165° and the juices run clear.
  14. Eat as is or pull off the bone for future use.

Notes

If you don't already own a large lidded stock pot or waterbath canner, flea markets and yard sales are a good place to look for one on the cheap. Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace might have good used ones, too.

https://culinarycraftiness.com/how-to-smoke-meat-on-the-stove-top/

In conclusion, with a minimal amount of effort, you can get great tasting meat in a stockpot. Give it a try – you won’t be sorry! If you have any questions about how to smoke meat on the stove top, don’t hesitate to ask!

Happy eating!

How to Smoke Meat on a Stove Top | Culinary Craftiness

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About Melissa

Melissa is a wife, mother, family cook, and romance novelist. The very first thing she learned in the kitchen was how to scramble eggs in an old cast iron skillet at the age of five. Her great-grandmother put her on a step-stool at the stove and thus began her passion for whipping up great tasting foods.

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