A Hawaiian Delight: Spam Musubi

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I’d never heard of this or even thought to search out any Hawaiian recipes until a good old friend from my hometown (who has been a resident of the Aloha State for many long years now) suggested it. He and I were emailing back and forth and the subject of cooking came up. No doubt I asked if he had any good recipes, but until that moment, it didn’t occur to me that the peoples of those gorgeous Pacific islands would whip up culinary masterpieces so very different than what we eat on the mainland.Hawaiian-spam-musubi-culinary-craftiness

I knew of their love of Spam, but I just assumed they fried it, slapped on some cheese, and placed it between two slices of bread. Au contraire, mon ami. They make heavenly special sauces to slather over it, slave over pots of perfectly sticky rice to rest it upon, wrap it in yards of shiny, dark green nori to make it feel all special and warm. They call it musubi and even have a special press just for this highly popular cuisine. How cool is that? 😀

Without further ado (and more flowery words):
Three things to note:

1. I don’t have the fancy press so I made my own out of a Spam can. Necessity is the mother of invention.

2. Three cups of raw rice makes 6 cups of cooked. My friend wasn’t specific so I went with the larger portion knowing I would save whatever was left and reheat it the next day for rice with milk and sugar. YUM!

3. See note at the bottom.

Hawaiian Spam Musubi
3 cups rice (use Calrose or other Asian sticky rice)
6 cups water
1 can Spam, cut into 8 equal slices
2 tbsp. soy sauce
2 tbsp. sugar
1 tbsp. Mirin sweet rice cooking wine
1 package of nori (seaweed wrap) (cut each sheet with scissors to a little less than the width of Spam)

Put water and rice in large pot or Dutch oven. Cover with lid, bring to a boil, reduce to simmer, and cook with lid on for 20 minutes. Remove from heat. (Or follow rice cooker directions.)

Mix soy sauce, sugar, and cooking mirin in a skillet. Once the mixture is heated up and the sugar starts to melt, add the Spam slices and cook. The Spam will be done when the liquid mixture gets very thick and kind of syrupy. Turn off the heat and let the Spam cool down in the skillet.

Using a musubi press, fill the press about 3/4 full of cooked rice and compact it, pressing down hard. Place one piece of Spam on the pressed rice and wrap with seaweed or nori, seal the nori with a little bit of water.

Pick up and eat like a sandwich.

3. We all loved the Spam coated in the sauce on a bed of rice. I made more sauce and another can of Spam and we enjoyed every bite! This one’s on the keeper list. 🙂

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A Hawaiian Delight: Spam Musubi

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Yield: Serves 4

A Hawaiian Delight: Spam Musubi

Created by Melissa Woolard | Culinary Craftiness

Ingredients

  • 3 cups rice (use Calrose or other Asian sticky rice)
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 can Spam, cut into 8 equal slices
  • 2 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tbsp. Mirin sweet rice cooking wine
  • 1 package of nori (seaweed wrap) (cut each sheet with scissors to a little less than the width of Spam)

Instructions

  1. Put water and rice in large pot or Dutch oven. Cover with lid, bring to a boil, reduce to simmer, and cook with lid on for 20 minutes. Remove from heat. (Or follow rice cooker directions.)
  2. Mix soy sauce, sugar, and cooking mirin in a skillet. Once the mixture is heated up and the sugar starts to melt, add the Spam slices and cook. The Spam will be done when the liquid mixture gets very thick and kind of syrupy. Turn off the heat and let the Spam cool down in the skillet.
  3. Using a musubi press, fill the press about 3/4 full of cooked rice and compact it, pressing down hard. Place one piece of Spam on the pressed rice and wrap with seaweed or nori, seal the nori with a little bit of water.
  4. Pick up and eat like a sandwich.
https://culinarycraftiness.com/a-hawaiian-delight-spam-musubi/

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About Melissa

Melissa is a wife, mother, family cook, and romance novelist. The very first thing she learned in the kitchen was how to scramble eggs in an old cast iron skillet at the age of five. Her great-grandmother put her on a step-stool at the stove and thus began her passion for whipping up great tasting foods.

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